TIP OF THE WEEK

Being outside more during the summer months can increase your risk of dehydration, skin sensitivities, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies, but eating more in-season fruits as the temperatures soar can help your body feel its best. According to WomansDay.com, here are some summer fruits to eat:

- Tomatoes

- Zucchini

- Watermelon

- Oranges

- Yogurt

- Celery and fennel

- Cantaloupe and honey dew

- Blackberries and raspberries

- Apples, figs and pears

- Apricots, peaches and nectarines

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EASY RECIPE

Country Ham and Broccoli Frittata

Serves: 4 to 6

Ingredients

8 large eggs

1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1/2 cup diced country ham

1 cup cooked broccoli florets, cut into small pieces

Directions

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, cheeses, salt and pepper.

Melt the butter in a large cast iron or nonstick skillet over medium-low heat.

Add the country ham and broccoli, and cook, stirring, until heated through, about 3 minutes. Add the egg mixture to the pan and cook, stirring with a rubber spatula, until the bottom and sides have just set, about 5 minutes.

Transfer to the oven and bake until the center has set and the frittata has turned a light golden brown, 8 to 10 minutes.

Flip the frittata out onto a cutting board, cut into equal wedges and serve immediately.

-SouthernKitchen.com

DRINK

Energy drinks can alter heart’s activity

According to a recent study conducted by researchers at the Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at the University of the Pacific, caffeinated energy drinks alter the heart’s electrical activity and raises blood blood pressure. The study found the changes in electrical activity is “generally considered mild,” but people who take certain medications or have a specific type of heart condition could be at increased risk of fatal arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat.

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FUN FACT

White chocolate

According to Bon Appetit, white chocolate doesn’t contain any real chocolate. It is made up of a blend of sugar, milk products, vanilla, lecithin and cocoa butter.

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