This week, I'm doing a series of posts on First in Print, a new program rolled out recently that encourages GateHouse Media newspapers to promote exclusive content to print and online readers each day.

This week, I'm doing a series of posts on First in Print, a new program rolled out recently that encourages GateHouse Media newspapers to promote exclusive content to print and online readers each day.

You can read more about the program at this blog post I did yesterday.

Over the course of the next few days I'll be addressing questions that editors have sent me about the program.

Today's question: What kind of content should we tease each day in First in Print?

The strategy calls to tease three stories each day that are print exclusive. Local newspapers are encouraged to do more if they choose, but we believe three offers even our smallest newspapers the opportunity to succeed because nearly all papers have a news, sports, some kind of lifestyle or society content and opinion, to pull from.

When deciding on the specific kinds of content to tease, it's important to think about diversity. For example, you don't want to tease every day that your police blotter is print exclusive. That will get stale quickly and readers will stop paying attention to the promotion. To make the promotion really useful newspapers need to make it dynamic each day. You could tell readers that you're public record content is exclusive each day, but consider a rotation of the kinds of public record content, like police blotter on Monday, court proceedings on Tuesday, jail listings on Wednesday, etc.

It's also important to consider a mix of topics. You don't want to be too heavy in news or sports or features on a given day. If I were behind a local editor's desk today, I would create a template for the content each day and it would look something like this:

1. Front page story: Consider one story every day on your front page that would be exclusive, using the content differentiation strategy as a guide. For example, if your center piece is more feature oriented, such as a human interest profile or coverage of a light school event, this would fit well into the strategy. You also could consider a strong news story that ins't necessarily something that had a more "news now" element to it the day before, but something that is more enterprise oriented, that has a trend focus to it like what's on the Rockford Register Star's homepage today as a print exclusive.

2. Sports: Consider one game story - normally a longer game story with lots of detail or description that we know print readers are willing to spend time with - that could be exclusive. We know from analytics that the big game from the night does well online the next day, because it's the big game, but prep roundups and other middle-of-the-season games that don't have playoff implications, don't do as well.

3. Static content: Consider things that appear every day and that we know print readers love. Build a list to pull from for promotion, such as community columns, local today in history, baseball standings or packages, comics content, and special classified pages. Building a library to pick from will make it easier to successfully implement this each day.

The content differentiation strategy notes a variety of other content that could be used as print exclusives, as well.

Have more questions about First in Print? Contact me at darkin@gatehousemedia.com.